Diabetes symptoms

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Often, there are no symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they include excessive thirst or urination, fatigue, weight loss, orDiabetes symptoms

Also called: diabetes mellitus

Often, there are no symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they include excessive thirst or urination, fatigue, weight loss, or blurred vision.

Most common types

  • Type 2 diabetes

    Symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, hunger, fatigue, and blurred vision. In some cases, there may be no symptoms.

  • Type 1 diabetes

    Symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, hunger, fatigue, and blurred vision.

  • Prediabetes

    Many people with prediabetes have no symptoms.

  • Gestational diabetes

    In most cases, there are no symptoms. A blood sugar test during pregnancy is used for diagnosis.

    Causes

    Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults.

    Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. With type 1 diabetes, beta cells produce little or no insulin.

    Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. This buildup of glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

    The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most likely it is an autoimmune disorder. This is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or another trigger causes the body to mistakenly attack the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, can be passed down through families.

    Causes

    Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy.

    When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As a result, blood sugar does not get into these cells to be stored for energy.

    When sugar cannot enter cells, a high level of sugar builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia.

    Type 2 diabetes usually occurs slowly over time. Most people with the disease are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed. Increased fat makes it harder for your body to use insulin the correct way.

    Type 2 diabetes can also develop in people who are thin. This is more common in the elderly.

    Family history and genes play a role in type 2 diabetes. Low activity level, poor diet, and excess body weight around the waist increase your chance of getting the disease